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Food and Drink on Dartmoor

See also our Activities Blog - cycling, canoeing, walking, fishing and riding; it's all here on Dartmoor.

Eat out on Dartmoor

Dartmoor, and the wider area of Devon, is blessed with an abundance of fresh, quality produce. Surrounded by rolling farmland, the county has a huge coastline, so sourcing fresh local meat, game and fish is no problem for hotels and restaurants in the area. As a result, you can find a fabulous range of eateries on Dartmoor – from Michelin-starred restaurants, to rustic pubs and traditional cafés, there’s something for every taste and every budget!

We regularly review places to eat and we are always interested to hear your own recommendations – do please contact us on … and let us know any you think we should be highlighting!

  • The Miners Arms is a unique 17th century pub and restaurant at the foot of Dartmoor, serving the best in local food and real ales. Beautifully positioned in the secluded hamlet of Hemerdon near Plympton, The Miners Arms gives you the perfect moorland pub setting with fabulous views looking out over Plymouth Sound. Aside from their wonderful food, they take pride in being a real ale pub, and offer some fine drops to bend one’s elbow! Serving five real ales, they mix things up by taking in two guest ales each month. Their established three are a prime choice of Bass Pale Ale, local Jail Ale, and their own exclusive ‘Tungsten Tipple’.
  • The Royal Oak Inn in the Dartmoor village of Meavy. - It's all here: cask ales, scrumpy cider, even its own Meavy Oak Ale. Great pub grub, hugely atmospheric, and loved by families, cyclists walkers and their dogs. A lovely old-fashioned Dartmoor pub, on the village green (still with its 'royal oak'), where ponies trot by in summer and beauty and birdsong surround you. It's often busy with locals and walkers but if you're lucky you'll find a pew in the ancient slab-floored bar, or outside on one of the picnic benches on the cobbled courtyard overlooking the village green. Ales including a monthly guest are local and cask-conditioned; they even have their own Meavy Oak Ale, brewed by Dartmoor brewery in Princetown; there's scrumpy aplenty and ten wines by the glass. The food is the best of pub grub: Wednesday night is Pie Night, Friday is Fish and Chips Night, beef and lamb comes from Dartmoor farms and the tartare sauce is homemade. Piped music and cribbage, muddy boots and muddy paws a seriously good bolthole for families and hikers. Join us for the annual Meavy Oak fair on 20th of June or the Cider and Ale festival on the August bank holiday weekend.
  • Welcome, pull up a stool at the bar, or relax on our comfy sofa. Situated in the Dartmoor National Park, the Chagford Inn prides itself on the quality of its ales, beers and wines. It also provides one of the most imaginative menus to be found in Devon. We have a good range of beers, we always have at least two real ales on tap plus three Continental lager beers. We also sell Meantime London Pale Ale, which is unusual in this part of the world, and proving popular!
    Read the Dartmoor Accommodation Review:
  • A traditional roadside inn where families, visitors and locals are welcome. The popular bar area accommodates pool, darts, TV, a large fire and up to five real ales. This is complemented by a spacious restaurant and garden with views to Dartmoor. Music nights, charity events, a Sunday carvery and a bank holiday beer festival feature in the pubs calendar. The pub closes on Mondays and weekend afternoons in the winter.
  • Situated 2 minutes from the A30 and 10 mins from the Historic city of Exeter and on the very boundary of Dartmoor National Park, The Old Thatch offers something for everyone. Whether you want to sit in our sun trap beer garden for a refreshing tipple on a warm summers’ day or in front of our stunning double sided log burner in winter, we’re always happy to see you. With award winning food and a wide selection of drinks to choose from,The Old Thatch Inn is the perfect place to relax.
  • We are a “locals” pub, open from midday every day, best described as traditional without being old-fashioned. We are family and dog friendly ensuring that all members of the clan can enjoy a visit to our cosy pub or fabulous garden! Regular live music events also form part of our weekly programme. We specialise in Real Ale, and feature in the CAMRA Good Beer Guide for 2017, but also offer a fine selection of local ciders, premium lagers & wines. Our accommodation features three charming double en-suite B&B rooms . Twice yearly beer festival
  • Substantial pub on the road between Yelverton and Princetown, close to the picturesque Burrator Reservoir. It has several rooms including a separate dining room, plus a pool table and two dartboards. Home-made food and pies use ingredients from local suppliers are served throughout the day. There is ample parking and a large enclosed beer garden incorporating a children’s play area. A beer festival is held annually in September; a Sunday quiz night, live music and other entertainment feature regularly.
  • The Who'd Have Thought It Inn in Milton Combe, is a cosy Devon Free-hold pub on the edge of Dartmoor National Park. We take great pride in serving fresh seasonal food, regularly changing real ales and quaffable wines in a picture post card setting, a stones throw from the National Trusts Buckland Abbey. We welcome dogs and offer the perfect place to relax in the garden to the sound of the babbling brook or warm your cockles by the log fires in the colder months. The Whody is back in the care of owners Paul and Jacquie Lisney and pub dog Hector following an extensive but sympathetic refurbishment, we look forward to welcoming you.
  • Home of the Neolithic South Zeal menhir, this 13th-century former Benedictine monastery is said to be the oldest heritage pub in Devon and Cornwall. Steeped in history, the largely untouched interior has to be seen. Two beers are brewed specially for the pub, which are served alongside two changing guest ales, together with a local cider. AA Rosette Restaurant.
  • The Gym Bar at the Edgemoor Hotel has a huge array of drinks for you to choose from. Heather, one of the owners, loves gin and as a result, has collected the widest variety of gins in probably the whole of Devon. There is also a huge range of the finest wine, beers and soft drinks for you to slurp whilst sat by the fire or playing chess with your friends. Not forgetting the wonderful garden grounds; grab a bottle of wine and share it on a bench in the garden or catch the last of the evening sun down by the on-site pottery.
  • The East Dart Hotel is a famous and historic Dartmoor coaching Inn with origins dating back to 1861. Family run business just steps away from the famous clapper bridge at Postbridge.
  • Cosy and friendly pub, dating from the 16th century, in a pleasant village on the edge of Dartmoor. It attracts a regular clientele who are happy to be assisted with the daily crossword. The inviting traditional interior features an intimate meeting area, a public bar and a restaurant area in which to sample the good food. The garden, with a stream, is an enjoyable suntrap.
  • The Dartmoor Bar and Lounge has a relaxed atmosphere, where dogs are also welcome. The bar is open daily for morning coffee, cream teas, lunch, afternoon tea and dinner. Unwind by the fire (in the colder months) on the comfy sofas with a newspaper or a good book, meet a friend for a catch up over tea or enjoy a glass of wine after a hard day at the office. Our Dartmoor Bar is open to non-residents too, so if you happen to be passing-by, do call in.
  • Serving home-cooked and locally sourced food, The Globe Inn is popular with locals and visitors alike. It offers an exciting, regularly changed menu, a choice of Devon real ales and a comprehensive wine list. Food is served throughout the Inn, so you can choose where to eat – enjoy the banter in the bar, relax in the lounge bar or take your time in the dining room.
    Read the Dartmoor Accommodation Review:
  • Known to have been an inn during the 17th Century, it was originally a Devon Long house, parts of which are medieval. Important persons hung their banners or standards outside the inns where they took temporary lodgings - the White Hart sign, with a collar of gold, became a favourite badge of King Richard II.
  • Award-winning 16th century country Inn serving delicious food, over 200 different wines, 250 whiskies and lots of local cheeses. Winning numerous awards for their drinks bible including The Trencherman's Guides "Best bar list 2017" & The British Pub awards regional winner!
  • Recently refurbished The Dartmoor Halfway Inn is situated on the edge of Dartmoor National Park (A383), a few miles west of Newton Abbot. An idyllic site, surrounded by green fields and woodland, with the River Lemon flowing alongside.
  • The Rugglestone Inn is a unique, unspoilt Dartmoor inn delightfully located in the picturesque village of Widecombe in the Moor. Originally a cottage the grade II listed building was converted to an inn back in 1832 and named after a local logan stone. It is surrounded by peaceful moorland, adjacent to a pretty stream and just a few minutes walk from the centre of the village.
  • With 2 AA Rosettes for fine dining, a passion for local produce and a team of genuinely helpful staff, The Horn of Plenty has been regarded as one of the very best restaurants in Devon for 50 years.   With the stunning, untouched beauty of the Tamar Valley as the backdrop, diners are invited to enjoy a truly unique experience.
    Read the Dartmoor Accommodation Review:
  • Drake's Cafe was formerly the Halfway House pub. Now it takes full advantage of being situated on Drake's Trail (Route 27 cycle path) and is open from 9am to 5pm Monday to Sunday serving breakfasts, lunches, afternoon teas and a great selection of homemade cakes. Ideal stopping place for lunch or refreshments, and as it is still licensed you could even sample a local ale!

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